PRIORITY: PARENTS' BILL OF RIGHTS

PRIORITY: PARENTS' BILL OF RIGHTS

SB 152: The Parents' Rights Act

This bill would affirm the fundamental right of parents to direct and consent to the medical care, education, upbringing and religious training of their children.  It requires the state to have a compelling interest before it restricts parental rights.

It also requires the state to have a compelling interest before it restricts parental rights.

Introduced By: Sen. Stephen West.

THE DEBATE

Advocates Say:
It is the parents’ right and responsibility to direct the care of their children.

Historically, parents’ rights have been considered fundamental rights. But, in 2000, a US Supreme Court opinion opened the door for re-interpretation.

Since then, there has been a disturbing trend of government allowing others to make decisions for children without parental consent or even knowledge. Children have been removed from homes without due process because a government official questioned a decision parents made for their child.

Case in point, just north of Kentucky (in Cincinnati) a liberal judge removed a 17-year-old girl from her parents because they were against a sex change operation that she wanted.

Opponents Say:
This law isn’t needed. The United Nations says that parents already have rights and children must have their own rights as well.

Parents should not “bully” their children. In fact, children, in consultation with professionals, should be able to make their own decisions. If the parents do not agree, a child should be given other guardians and allowed to determine for themselves what path they wish to take whether it be education, religion, medicine or any other area.

Children’s rights to determine for themselves should be respected and should either overrule the rights of parents or have the same standing as parents’ rights.

Bill's Progress

Introduced in Senate (02/08/2019)

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